Healthcare News

How to Keep Your Spine Happy While Working – or Learning – at Home

Whether you're the parent of a young student who is learning remotely this fall or a student yourself – or you're working from home – understanding ways to minimize your spine injury risk is essential.

Read more

Source: US News


Unhealthy drinking habits seen with some psychiatric disorders

Patients with anxiety disorder, depression, and bulimia nervosa who drink alcohol are likely to exceed recommended limits, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Researc

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Suicide rates increase after disasters strike, researcher finds

A team of researchers including the University of Delaware's Jennifer Horney, founding director of the epidemiology program in the College of Health Sciences, examined the impact of 281 natural disasters on suicide rates during a 12-year span.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


What uncertainty can mean for your mind and body

From the macro level of the pandemic, climate change, social and political unrest to the personal level of job uncertainty, illnesses within families and various levels of social isolation—any and all of these contribute to a sense of uncertainty.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Causes and Treatment of Swayback Posture

Swayback posture is a particular type of poor posture that often leads to lower back pain. People who exhibit swayback posture have exaggerated curves in their spine, forward-tilting hips, and the appearance of leaning back when standing.

Read more

Source: healthline


How Long Does a Pinched Nerve Last?

If you suspect you have a pinched nerve, read on to learn what steps you can take now to help and what to expect during your recovery.

Read more

Source: healthline


Social distancing is increasing loneliness in older adults

Social distancing introduced in response to COVID-19 is increasing feelings of loneliness in Scotland's older population and impacting their wellbeing, according to a new University of Stirling study.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Augmented Reality for Spinal Surgery

Spinal surgery is a last resort when medications and non-surgical treatments are not working. The surgery itself must be precise to get the best outcomes. Now there’s a new FDA-approved augmented reality device that’s helping surgeons have a more accurate and faster surgery—translating to a better recovery for patients.

Read more

Source: News Medical Life Sciences


Can You Prove You Have Whiplash?

More than two-million Americans suffer from whiplash each year, and about 10 percent of them become permanently disabled. Minor neck injuries account of up to 60 percent of all permanent impairment claims, and over one million people will have chronic pain. Yet, whiplash remains one of the hardest injuries to prove.

Read more

Source: Newswire


Novel neuroimaging study on dissociative symptoms reveals wounds of childhood trauma

A team led by investigators at McLean Hospital has now found that brain imaging analyses can uncover changes in functional connections between brain regions linked to a specific individual's dissociative symptoms following trauma.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


6 cervical pillow options

The neck makes up a small portion of the spinal column. Healthcare professionals refer to this section as the cervical spine. A specialist cervical pillow adds a layer of extra support for the neck while a person sleeps or lies down.

Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to predict loneliness

Accurately assessing the breadth and depth of societal loneliness is daunting, limited by available tools, such as self-reports. In a new proof-of-concept paper, published online September 24, 2020 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, a team led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine used artificial intelligence technologies to analyze natural language patterns (NLP) to discern degrees of loneliness in older adults.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Disruption of work relationships adds to mental-health concern

A recent Harvard study highlights how much emotional support we get from workplace relationships, and that it has not only been our jobs that the pandemic has disrupted, but these important informal ties as well.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


3 research-based ways to cope with the uncertainties of pandemic life

If you're having trouble handling pandemic uncertainty, psychology research can offer tips on how to deal with these unprecedented times.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Upper back pain between shoulder blades: Is it serious?

Poor posture, injury, or problems with the spine can all lead to upper back pain. A common cause of pain between the shoulder blades is muscle strain.

Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Back-pain patients taking opioid painkillers produce anti-opioid antibodies

University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have discovered that a majority of back-pain patients they tested who were taking opioid painkillers produced anti-opioid antibodies. These antibodies may contribute to some of the negative side effects of long-term opioid use.

Read more

Source: News Medical Life Sciences


8 Myths About Your Back - Busted

Misinformation about back problems abounds. How many times have you heard that exercise can hurt your back? Or that if you consult a spine surgeon about pain, you’re sure to wind up in surgery? If you have back pain, it’s important to get the facts straight from the experts.

Read more

Source: healthessentials


The Loneliness of Social Isolation Can Affect Your Brain and Raise Dementia Risk in Older Adults

Feeling lonely is the social equivalent to feeling physical pain. It even triggers the same pathways in the brain tht are involved in processing emotional responses to physical pain.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Experiencing Childhood Trauma Makes Body and Brain Age Faster: Study

Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. The study examined three different signs of biological aging—early puberty, cellular aging and changes in brain structure—and found that trauma exposure was associated with all three.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Best Stretches For Lower Back Flexibility And Pain Relief

Lower back problems are very common. They can cause a constant dull ache or a sudden sharp pain. Lower back pain has a variety of possible causes, which range from poor posture to underlying medical conditions. However, certain stretches may help by relieving pain and improving flexibility.

Read more

Source: Medical News Today


What You Need To Know About Occipital Neuralgia

Occipital neuralgia is a type of headache. It starts in the upper neck or back of the head and can radiate behind the eyes and over the scalp.

Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Hip Replacement May Also Ease Back Pain

If you have a bad hip and lower back pain, a new study suggests that hip replacement surgery may solve both issues at once.

Read more

Source: WebMD


Poor Mental Health in Lockdown Most Common Among Young Women

Young women are the most likely to have experienced high levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness in lockdown, compared to older adults, according to new research from the UCL Center for Longitudinal Studies (CLS).

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Ten Tips for Looking After Your Back While You're Sitting Down

Working from home is challenging. Apart from reduced social interaction and the domestic juggling involved, homes are not usually designed to replicate a workplace environment when it comes to employees' health.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


The best sleeping positions that experts recommend for back pain, acid reflux, and more

It's important to make sure you're sleeping in the right position that will help you get enough quality sleep each night.

Read more

Source: Insider


Understanding 'big emotions': Early intervention helps reduce toddler tantrums

Parents of young toddlers with challenging behaviors have found support through a new early-intervention program aimed at children aged 12-24 months, a study has shown.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Is Your Neck Pain Preventing You From a Good Night's Sleep?

Too much time in front of a computer can lead to neck pain it can also could be preventing you from getting a good night's rest. Here's why.

Read more

Source: Patch


Does teenage anxiety have its roots in infancy?

The fact that teenagers worry isn't necessarily a concern—it's when the adolescent brain amplifies and distorts a simple worry that mental health problems can arise. As scientists aim to unlock why teenagers get anxious, and how infancy and upbringing are implicated, early intervention strategies are being refined to redirect harmful thoughts and teach adolescents to read the emotions of others—a crucial way to keep their own distressing feelings in check.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


How to have a better day during the pandemic

It's entirely reasonable during a pandemic to feel more stressed, anxious, lonely and depressed than usual. Yet, despite the circumstances, some people are doing OK. Some people continue to feel love for others, gratitude for what they have and joy in the small things.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Playtime with dad may improve children's self-control

Children whose fathers make time to play with them from a very young age may find it easier to control their behavior and emotions as they grow up, research suggests.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


What doctors wish their patients knew about spinal fusions

There is a great deal of misinformation on the internet and in the media about spinal surgery and specifically spinal fusion. When contemplating a spinal surgery and deciding if a fusion is necessary, it is critical to consider multiple factors. First and foremost, the vast majority of patients with a spine problem can be successfully treated and live a good quality of life without ever undergoing a spinal surgery.

Read more

Source: National Spine Health Foundation


Drug Might Relieve Low Back Pain in Whole New Way

A new nonopioid pain reliever could be welcome news for people who have difficult-to-treat back pain. Tanezumab is what's called a monoclonal antibody. And it might offer extended relief from chronic lower back pain, a large, new study finds.However, a serious side effect remains a concern.

Read more

Source: WebMD


Kyphoplasty: Uses, benefits, and risks

Kyphoplasty is a surgical procedure to treat vertebral compression fractures. It can reduce pain and increase mobility. It offers a minimally invasive alternative to other surgeries.

Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Our brains are powerful—but secretive—forecasters of video virality

When Stanford University neuroscientist Brian Knutson tracked his smartphone usage, he was shocked to learn that he spent twice as much time on his phone as he had anticipated.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Is It Normal to Have Back Pain After a C-Section?

Back pain after giving birth can be nerve-racking, especially when you’re still recovering from surgery. You probably expected to feel some discomfort from the incision, but now you’re aching in more places than you thought possible. There isn’t a single possible cause of pain, but rather several plausible explanations for aches, which you might feel in your upper or lower back.

Read more

Source: healthline


You can do it! A 'growth mindset' helps us learn

One of the most influential phenomena in education over the last two decades has been that of the "growth mindset". This refers to the beliefs a student has about various capacities such as their intelligence, their ability in areas such as maths, their personality and creative ability.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Altruism may not make people as happy as prior studies suggested

A pair of researchers, one with the University of Bonn, the other Harvard University, has found that altruism may not make people as happy as prior studies have suggested. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Armin Falk and Thomas Graeber describe a study they carried out with student volunteers and what they learned.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


5 Ways to Keep Your Spine Healthy and Happy

Whether it's a herniated disc, spinal stenosis, or strained muscles, it can take some time to diagnose and treat the causes of back pain. And all the while, you're trying to navigate health insurance, work and family life, and everyday stressors in addition to your back pain.

Read more

Source: Spine-health


Low back and neck pain tops U.S. health spending

Seeing a physician or other health specialist for low back and neck pain? You're not alone, according to a new scientific study.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Reasons for Revision Spine Surgery

Revision spine surgery may be deemed necessary by your doctor (or you) if you still have symptoms after the first procedure, or if you have new symptoms. But how do you know if you really need that 2nd back surgery? Check this list to start your research.

Read more

Source: Verywell Health


Lifetime suicide risk factors identified

A review of studies into suicide risk factors at different stages of peoples' lives, as well as of the effectiveness of assessment and treatment approaches, has found that while some factors such as genetics and family history play a part in suicide risk throughout life, other factors including clinical depression, substance misuse, lack of social support and economic factors become stronger after adolescence.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


3 easy deskside stretches to keep muscle pain at bay

If you're not taking regular breaks to move around during your workday, your muscles may rebel after being scrunched in your desk chair hour after hour.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Brain imaging may improve diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders

Brain imaging may one day be used to help diagnose mental health disorders—including depression and anxiety—with greater accuracy, according to a new study conducted in a large sample of youth at the University of Pennsylvania and led by Antonia Kaczkurkin, Ph.D. and Theodore Satterthwaite, MD.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Robotic trunk support assists those with spinal cord injury

An engineering team has invented a robotic device -- the Trunk-Support Trainer (TruST) -- that can be used to assist and train people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to sit more stably by improving their trunk control, and thus gain an expanded active sitting workspace without falling over or using their hands to balance.

Read more

Source: Science Daily


One dose of radiotherapy as effective as five doses for cancer in the spine

A single dose of radiotherapy is as "effective" as five doses for end-of-life cancer patients suffering with painful spinal canal compression, finds a large study conducted by UCL.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Imaging study provides new biological insights on functional neurological disorder

Individuals with functional neurological disorder (FND) have symptoms not explained by traditional neurological conditions, including limb weakness, tremor, gait abnormalities, seizures and sensory deficits.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Exposure to PM 2.5 pollution linked to brain atrophy, memory decline

Women in their 70s and 80s who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution experienced greater declines in memory and more Alzheimer's-like brain atrophy than their counterparts who breathed cleaner air, according to USC researchers.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Increased, but low, suicide risk associated with use of anti-epileptic drugs

Three of the most common forms of anti-epileptic drugs in Denmark are associated with an increase in patients' risk of suicide. However, the risk is low and should be seen in conjunction with the many beneficial effects of the medicines. This is the conclusion of a new study carried out by researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Free Fragment (Sequestered Disc) Treatment

A free fragment, also known as a sequestered disc, is one type of herniated disc in which a piece breaks off from the main structure. Once separated, the detached fragment can, and often does, move up or down, causing symptoms or repercussions at an entirely different level of the spine.

Read more

Source: Verywell Health


Beware of swimming if you use deep brain stimulation for Parkinson`s

Researchers have identified nine cases of people who lost their ability to swim after having a deep brain stimulation device implanted to control symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The new research is published in the November 27, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


People who cannot read may be three times as likely to develop dementia

New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write, may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write.

Read more

Source: Science Daily


Causes of Neck Pain and Treatment Options

Neck pain has many potential causes ranging from acute problems, like muscle strains and whiplash, to conditions that develop over time, such as cervical spondylosis (neck osteoarthritis) and myofascial pain syndrome. Pinched nerves, infections, fractures, and spinal cord problems are other possible reasons you may be experiencing neck pain.

Read more

Source: Verywell Health


Chronic Back Pain? You May Find Relief With Behavioral Medicine

No pain, no gain? Not true for people suffering from chronic back pain. Instead, it’s the opposite: Back pain is one of the main causes of missed work (and missed paychecks). But could the key to coping with chronic back pain be in your mind?

Read more

Source: healthessentials


Looking for links between Parkinson's and bipolar disorder

A new systematic review and meta-analysis ask whether bipolar disorder is associated with developing Parkinson's disease. Although the authors conclude that there is a link, it is a tough question to unpick.

Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Long-term study data shows DBS is effective treatment for most severe form of depression

A study published online on Friday, October 4, in the American Journal of Psychiatry found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of an area in the brain called the subcallosal cingulate (SCC) provides a robust antidepressant effect that is sustained over a long period of time in patients with treatment-resistant depression—the most severely depressed patients who have not responded to other treatments.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


When to Worry About Back Pain in Kids

Back pain is a well-known source of discomfort in adults, but it is also being diagnosed more frequently in children and adolescents. Most parents don't expect otherwise healthy children to complain of back pain—a problem generally associated with middle age or later. However, back pain has been found to occur in between 14% and 24% of children and adolescents.

Read more

Source: Verywell Health


Tips for Preventing Degenerative Disc Disease

As the name suggests, degenerative disc disease is (mostly) an age-related process that goes on in your spine in which the shock-absorbing cushion located between adjacent spinal vertebrae (bones) deteriorates.

Read more

Source: Verywell Health


Is Your Back Pain Non-Specific, Mechanical, or Serious?

Non-specific low back pain is the type of back pain that neither you nor your doctor can definitively, accurately trace back to its root. In other words, it is not related to a specific, diagnosable disease. An example is a back muscle strain due to an athletic injury or other trauma.

Read more

Source: Verywell Health


Health Tip: Lifting Heavy Things

People who practice smart lifting techniques are less likely to suffer muscle sprains, pulls and injuries caused by heavy lifting.

Read more

Source: Health Day


Why do some people stop breathing after seizures?

Could a chemical produced by the brain that regulates mood, sleep and breathing also be protective in people with epilepsy? New research has found that higher levels of serotonin in the blood after a seizure are linked to a lower incidence of seizure-related breathing problems called apneas, when a person temporarily stops breathing.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


FDA approves first spinal tether device to treat children with idiopathic scoliosis

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first spinal tether device intended to be used in children and adolescents to correct the most common form of scoliosis, called idiopathic scoliosis, that has not responded to conservative treatment options, such as external bracing.

Read more

Source: News Medical


Deep brain stimulation eases Parkinson’s disease symptoms by boosting dopamine

In a new study of seven people with Parkinson's disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that deep brain stimulation using electrical impulses jumpstarts the nerve cells that produce the chemical messenger dopamine to reduce tremors and muscle rigidity that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease, and increases feelings of well-being.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Easy neck stretches for tension relief

It can happen when you're stuck in traffic, or hunched over for hours at your desk, or even sitting in the stands watching your child's lacrosse game—that painful twinge in the back of your neck.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Exercises for easing and preventing upper back pain

Upper back pain and tension are common complaints, particularly when people feel stressed or spend a lot of time hunched over desks or computers. Exercises that stretch the neck, shoulders, and upper back can help relieve pain and loosen tight muscles.

Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Specific multinutrient combination benefits patients with early stage Alzheimer`s disease

A new longitudinal study has shown that a nutritional drink designated a "food for special medical purposes" containing the multinutrient combination Fortasyn Connect can benefit patients with the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment, who are at risk of progressing to the dementia stage of AD, report scientists in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease Reports.

Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Ankylosing spondylitis: Nine possible complications

Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that often lasts a lifetime. Anyone diagnosed with the condition should be aware of the complications that it presents to health.

Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Brain disease kills more than 100 Indian children

More than 100 children in the Indian state of Bihar—home to some of the country's worst health indicators—have now been killed by a brain virus potentially linked to lychees, officials said.

» Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Parkinson disease incidence lower in hep C patients who receive antivirals

The incidence of Parkinson disease (PD) is lower for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who receive interferon-based antiviral therapy, according to a study published online June 5 in JAMA Neurology.

» Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Causes of lower back pain when standing or walking

Lower back pain is very common, so determining an underlying cause may often come down to looking at other symptoms and details.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Why adults at risk for Huntington`s choose not to learn if they inherited deadly gene

As many as 90 percent of individuals who have a parent with Huntington's disease (HD) choose not to take a gene test that reveals if they will also develop the fatal disorder -- and a new study details the reasons why.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


What can cause a tingling sensation on the back?

A tingling, or pins and needles, sensation in the back can result from conditions that affect the underlying nerves. Doctors refer to this sensation as paresthesia. Causes can include infections, spinal injuries, fibromyalgia, and vascular malformations.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Safe exercises for a herniated disk

Gentle exercises, stretches, and activities can all help relieve the pain of a herniated disk. Exercises can also strengthen and improve flexibility in the spine, neck, and back.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


How a golf swing can lead to early lumbar degeneration

The authors describe how the modern golfer repeatedly experiences minor traumatic injuries to the spine, which over time can result in a pathogenic process termed 'repetitive traumatic discopathy

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Computers can be a real pain in the neck

Many people slouch or strain their necks while working at the computer. A new study shows how jutting the head forward to read more closely compresses the neck and leads to neck and shoulder problems.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Quadriplegic Mayo scientist helps advance spine injury tech

A team of researchers at Minnesota’s Mayo clinic, led by an individual who was left with quadriplegia from a teenage injury, are pushing the boundaries of spinal regeneration, according to a new Star Tribune report.

» Read more

Source: Mass Device


Defects More Common Than Expected in Kids After Zika Exposure

About 1 in 7 babies aged 12 to 18 months who were exposed to Zika virus before birth have significant neurodevelopmental problems, a study published online December 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine shows.

» Read more

Source: Medscape


Brain Stimulation of Novel Target Improves Depression

Direct electrical stimulation of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) acutely improves mood in patients with depressive symptoms, new research shows.

» Read more

Source: Medscape


Obesity, risk of cognitive dysfunction? Consider high-intensity interval exercise

It's fast-paced, takes less time to do, and burns a lot of calories. High-intensity interval exercise is widely recognized as the most time-efficient and effective way to exercise.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Low back pain: Pulsed radiofrequency may be the answer

A new study reveals that pulsed radiofrequency may help patients with low back pain that has not responded to conservative therapy.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


New gene variants associated with chronic back pain

Chronic back pain is the number one cause of years lived with disability worldwide. Medical researchers have now identified three novel genetic variants associated with chronic back pain.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


What to know about head and brain MRI scans

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans provide 3-D images of specific body parts. The scan produces highly detailed images from every angle.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Inflammatory back pain resolves in many patients

Runsheng Wang, M.D., from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, and colleagues examined long-term outcomes in patients with IBP and predictors of progression to SpA.

» Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Sitting, standing, walking: How do they affect your memory?

Previous research has shown that exercise is beneficial for the brain and that it helps treat depression and prevent cognitive decline. So, what is the importance of posture and movement for the brain? A new study investigates.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Simple, cost effective treatment following failed back surgery shows promise

Failed back surgery (continued low back and leg pain after surgery) is relatively common. With each reoperation, success, as defined by pain reduction, becomes less likely and most patients do not improve.

» Read more

Source: BUMC


Health insurer policies may discourage use of non-opioid alternatives for lower back pain

Public and private health insurance policies in the U.S. are missing important opportunities to encourage the use of physical therapy, psychological counseling and other non-drug alternatives to opioid medication for treating lower back pain, a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found.

» Read more

Source: UC News


Could omega-3 supplements help reduce anxiety?

A recently published meta-analysis concludes that omega-3 oil supplements might reduce symptoms of anxiety for some people.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


What are the health effects of chronic stress?

Today's life rhythms and demands are often challenging and require intense physical and psychological efforts in order to be sustained. An individual reacts to physical and mental strain that is potentially health threatening by activating interconnected neuroendocrine circuits.

» Read more

Source: NCBI


Magnetic surgical cement heals spinal fractures, provides targeted drug delivery

Patients with spinal fractures caused by tumors or osteoporosis usually undergo a procedure called kyphoplasty, where the fracture is filled with surgical cement. While kyphoplasty can stabilize the bone, cancer patients are still often left with spinal column tumors that are very hard to reach with conventional chemotherapy, which has to cross the blood-brain barrier when delivered intravenously.

» Read more

Source: Today


Can neck pain be a sign of something serious?

It is common for people to experience pain in the right side of the neck. In most cases, the pain occurs due to a muscle strain or another benign cause. People can often treat their pain using home remedies and medications. However, for severe or prolonged neck pain, it is best to see a doctor.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


How do you stretch out your tailbone?

The tailbone, or coccyx, is at the bottom of the spine and helps to support the pelvis. It is possible to injure or fracture the tailbone, causing inflammation and pain. Persistent tailbone pain is known as coccydynia.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Tending to the diaphragm may relieve chronic low back pain

Is treating the diaphragm the key to relieving chronic pain in the lower back? Researchers set out to investigate, conducting the first ever clinical trial to test the efficacy of special osteopathic techniques tending to the diaphragm for easing chronic low back pain.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Which Doctor Can Help Me With Back Pain?

If you hurt a joint or strain a muscle, sometimes there's comfort in knowing that at least others feel your pain. If you're dealing with back pain, many will know exactly what you're going through.

» Read more

Source: Health US news


New imaging system makes back surgery safer, faster and less expensive

Researchers develop a new way to make back surgery safer, faster and more cost effective. Scientists have developed and tested a 3-dimensional, real-time optical tracking system, like a 'Google Maps' for the body.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Chronic dizziness can result from, or trigger, psychiatric disorders

Chronic nausea can outcome from a series of underlying health problems, many ordinarily involving neurologic, vestibular and cardiac diseases. For patients who have seen a accumulation of specialty physicians though reaching a diagnosis, a psychiatric mention competence assistance them find relief, researchers noted.

» Read more

Source: Health reload


Evidence mounts that daily opioid users may fare worse after spine surgery, study finds

In a multicenter database study of adults who had undergone surgery for spinal deformities, researchers say that those who had used narcotics daily on average had worse outcomes, such as longer intensive care unit stays and more severe postop disability, compared with those who did not use opioids preoperatively.

» Read more

Source: Johns Hopkins


Study reveals potential for more precise diagnosis and treatment of TBI

Patients who've suffered from traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) have changes in tiny blood vessels in their brains that researchers believe are linked to a range of cognitive symptoms, according to new findings presented at the 2018 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting. The findings may help doctors pinpoint specific types of TBIs and tailor personalized therapies.

» Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


First approved medication for tardive dyskinesia demonstrates safety, study shows

A recently FDA-approved medication for the movement disorder tardive dyskinesia is safe and well tolerated, according to neurologists presenting results from a yearlong monitoring study.

» Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Eight factors predict pain after spine surgery

Eight factors contribute to postoperative pain after spine surgery, according to a study presented at the 2018 World Congress on Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, held from April 19 to 21 in New York City.

» Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Young athletes commonly have bone marrow edema in lower spine, study shows

Bone marrow edema is common in the sacroiliac joints of both amateur and professional young athletes, with damage most frequently seen in the posterior lower ilium, according to research presented at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting.

» Read more

Source: Healio


Rocker bottom shoes help reduce chronic low back pain

A new study confirms that rocker bottom shoes helps strengthen back muscles, improving the spine's curvature and thus reducing low back pain.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Innovative tissue engineering strategies to repair spinal disc herniation

New therapeutic approaches to repair herniated discs in the lumbar spine using novel tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies have shown promising outcomes in preclinical studies and target the underlying problem of disc injury or instability, unlike current nonsurgical and surgical treatments.

» Read more

Source: Medical xpress


MS patients may benefit from vitamin D supplements

You may have heard some buzz about vitamin D and multiple sclerosis. There are some hopeful signs that it can ease your symptoms, but researchers still have a lot of work to do before we know for sure.

» Read more

Source: WebMD


New system to detect spinal deformity

Researchers have developed a symmetry-recognition system for the surface of the human back that can three-dimensionally detect the early stages of idiopathic scoliosis, a type of spinal deformity, without the help of a specialist doctor.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Bullying rates remain higher for children with disabilities, even as they mature

More than 22 percent of children ages 12-18 say they have been bullied in school within the last month; a significant portion of those children have disabilities. However, little research exists on how bullying rates for individual children change over time. Now, a researcher and bullying expert has determined that children with disabilities are victimized by bullying at a much higher rate over time than their peers without disabilities.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Minimally invasive treatment provides relief from back pain

The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back pain and sciatica, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

» Read more

Source: PR Newswire Association


All you need to know about levoscoliosis

Levoscoliosis is a form of scoliosis where the spine abnormally twists or curves to the left, sometimes making a 'C' shape.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


What is dextroscoliosis?

Dextroscoliosis refers to an abnormal, right-leaning curvature of the spine. It is a type of scoliosis.

» Read more

Source: Medical News Today


Visiting the doctor for low back pain? Expect something different now

If you visit your family doctor with low back pain (LBP), you may be surprised at the treatment options they suggest now. Recent changes to major international guidelines for the management of LBP mean that general practitioners (GP) are now unlikely to recommend pain medicines which were previously the go-to treatment. Instead of pain medicines, GPs might suggest non-medicinal approaches including yoga, mindfulness and various types of physiotherapy and psychological therapies.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Brain to Robot: Move, Please

Using the power of thought to control a robot that helps to move a paralysed hand: a project from the ETH Rehabilitation Engineering Laboratory could fundamentally change the therapy and daily lives of stroke patients.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Research finds decrease in opioid use among patients recovering from hip and knee replacement

Opioid use in patients recovering from hip and knee replacement decreased by one-third between 2006 and 2014, reflecting success in efforts to promote a multimodal approach to pain management (using a variety of methods to manage pain) rather than using opioids alone, reveals new research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2017 annual meeting.

» Read more

Source: News-medical.net


Brain activity buffers against worsening anxiety

Using non-invasive brain imaging, the researchers found that people at-risk for anxiety were less likely to develop the disorder if they had higher activity in a region of the brain responsible for complex mental operations. The results may be a step towards tailoring psychological therapies to the specific brain functioning of individual patients.

» Read more

Source: Science news line


Gene breakthrough on lithium treatment for bipolar disorder

Genes linked to schizophrenia in psychiatric patients suffering from bipolar disorder are the reason why such patients don't respond to the "gold standard" treatment for bipolar -- the drug lithium -- according to international research.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Study provides insights into potential causes of spinal stenosis

A new study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research indicates that certain genetic changes are linked with an increased risk of developing lumbar spinal stenosis, a narrowing of the open spaces in the lower spine that can lead to pain in the legs when individuals walk.

» Read more

Source: News-medical.net


Breakthrough research suggests potential treatment for autism, intellectual disability

A research team has identified the pathological mechanism for a certain type of autism and intellectual disability by creating a genetically modified mouse. They are hopeful it could eventually lead to a therapeutic fix.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


MRI uncovers brain abnormalities in people with depression, anxiety

Researchers using MRI have discovered a common pattern of structural abnormalities in the brains of people with depression and social anxiety, according to a study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

» Read more

Source: PR Newswire Association LLC


Mind over matter could reduce back pain anguish

Could mindfulness and meditation be more powerful than opioids for lower back pain?
The University of Queensland School of Psychology's Dr Melissa Day is conducting a project that will test that possibility and could even save lives.
"Chronic pain is implicated in an estimated 20 per cent of suicides in Australia, and is experienced by millions nation-wide," Dr Day said.

» Read more

Source: Medical Xpress


Scientists link bipolar disorder to unexpected brain region

For the first time, researchers show that ensembles of genes within the striatum could be deeply involved in bipolar disorder. Most modern studies of bipolar disorder have concentrated on the brain's cortex, the largest part of the brain in humans, associated with higher-level thought and action.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


No significant change seen in obesity status after TLIF despite clinical improvements

Although investigators found improvements for function and pain, they discovered no significant change in weight after obese patients underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

» Read more

Source: Healio


Foot wrap offers alternative to medication for patients with restless legs syndrome

Authors from Lake Erie Research Institute in Pennsylvania report an adjustable foot wrap caused to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS) is 1.4 times more effective than the standard pharmaceutical treatment. The pilot study published today in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Depression linked with worse subjective outcomes after epidural steroid injection for spinal pathology

Investigators found that after lumbar epidural steroid injection for degenerative spine disease, patients with depression had worse absolute scores for patient-reported outcomes and higher disability compared with patients who were not depressed.

» Read more

Source: Healio


Financial stress is associated with migraine, if you have specific circadian gene variants

People with a specific variation in the CLOCK gene have more migraines under financial stress. This work, the first time that the genetics of circadian rhythms has been shown to have an effect on migraine, is presented at the ECNP conference in Paris.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Brain changes linked to physical, mental health in functional neurological disorder

An imaging study has identified differences in key brain structures of individuals whose physical or mental health has been most seriously impaired by a common but poorly understood condition called functional neurological disorder, sometimes called conversion disorder.

» Read more

Source: Science Daily


Preoperative diagnosis predictive of patient satisfaction after lumbar spine surgery

Researchers identified patients who underwent lumbar spine surgery and were enrolled in the Quality Outcomes Database. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for back pain and leg pain preoperatively and at 1 year after surgery. Investigators grouped patients according to their diagnosis and response to a question regarding satisfaction.

» Read more

Source: Healio


  • American College of Osteopathic Surgeons
  • American Osteopathic Association
  • North American Spine Society
  • Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons of California
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • California Association of Neurological Surgeons
  • American Medical Association